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Tuesday, February 24, 2009

UT-AAUP Notice re Workloads

The following was distributed by UT-AAUP and is posted here merely as a courtesy and convenience for our readers. We are all very interested to hear how UT administrators plan to make up for their disasterous management decision to push early retirements and buy outs to so many professors (73 is the number some sources are reporting) all while sticking to a "no hires" policy, except for the favored few blessed by King Jake. Who will teach these professorless classes that are already scheduled? The administrators? This would assume they are qualified to do anything than spend other people's money on vacuous programs--e.g., the new one they are touting is "The Learning Paradigm" so apparently someone of the higher ups read yet another pamphlet that they found left on a bus seat. Maybe they plan to bus UTs already enrolled students to a nearby community college. Or maybe the administrators plan to start a community/junior college right here on the UT campus.

UT-AAUP Notice begins below....


UT-AAUP
2/22/2009 Reminder


Dear Colleague:

Over the past few weeks there has been much discussion, rumors and statements about faculty workload. Administrative letters and documents such as the budget preparation documents and letters from the provost clearly indicate the administration's interest in, if not increasing the teaching portion of everyone's workload, at the very least of examining it very closely. Despite these indications from on high, the process of workload as described in the Collective Bargaining Agreement is a bottom-up process: "Each department, or equivalent unit, annually shall establish the workload for individuals within that department, or equivalent unit ..." The way this is intended to work is the Department Chair meets with each faculty member to discuss his/her workload. Workloads are to take into account all three areas of faculty activity: teaching, scholarly activity, and service. In fact, the contract details some of the items that must be considered in Section 10.3.2.3.1. Specifically, this reads:

The listing below shall include, but not be limited to, the specific items to be considered when developing workload.

10.3.2.3.1 Classroom teaching
10.3.2.3.1.1 Number of course preparations
10.3.2.3.1.2 Availability of teaching support resources
10.3.2.3.1.3 Class size
10.3.2.3.1.4 Course time requirements
10.3.2.3.2 Development of new courses, laboratories, or instructional facilities
10.3.2.3.3 Student conferences (including office hours),
10.3.2.3.4 Off-site instruction greater than 25 miles one-way from campus
10.3.2.3.5 Individual and special instruction
10.3.2.3.6 Advising
10.3.2.3.7 Clinical supervision of students
10.3.2.3.8 Supervision of thesis and dissertation research and writing
10.3.2.3.9 Coordinator duties
10.3.2.3.10 Professional librarian duties
10.3.2.3.11 Creative and performance activities (whether as principal or as student mentor or supervisor)
10.3.2.3.12 Scholarly and professional activities (including writing for publication)
10.3.2.3.13 Sponsored research
10.3.2.3.14 Special assignments
10.3.2.3.15 Unpaid consulting
10.3.2.3.16 Departmental, College, University and community service

Given the administrative interest we expect that the workload issues will be more conflicted than usual this year. Please read carefully Article 10 (Workload) in the contract and be aware of your rights and responsibilities. The article also includes a procedure to follow if you are unable to come to an agreement about your workload. If problems persist, please contact the UT-AAUP.

Lecturers' issues pertaining to workload are still being investigated. If you have questions, please contact Mary Jane Erard at the UT-AAUP office, ut-aaup@mindspring.com. More information will be forthcoming regarding the Lecturer contract and workload.

Sincerely,
UT-AAUP Executive Board and Officers,
Harvey Wolff, President,
Don Wedding, Grievance Chair,
Mary Jane Erard, Executive Director.

Contact Info:
ext. 7270
email: ut-aaup@mindspring.com

3 comments:

None said...

Maybe the increased workloads are retribution for this blog's racism?

UT said...

From yesterday's inside higher ed, an article on workloads: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/02/24/babb

Ho Hum said...

None the Dennouncer, welcome back. I missed your peculiar brand of emotionally disturbed chit chat. Send any bizarre messages to the entire university recently? Keep in touch.